Skip to main content

About your Search

20120928
20121006
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
for "new york" magazine. norah o'donnell is my cohost on cbs this morning, correspondent for cbs news, mike murphy a columnness for "time" magazine. from washington, albert hunt, executive editor of bloomberg news. from denver john dickerson, cbs news' political director and political correspondent at slate.com. and joining us also from denver katty kay of the bbc. i'm pleased to have all of them for this event we've all been waiting for. i go to al hubble. a simple question, who won, who lost, why. >> i don't know if that's simple but if i had to pick i would say governor romney won. he set the awe general de more than the president did. he affectively and aggressive attacked the president's record and did a pretty good job defending his own. ice going to have problems the next couple days on taxes however because he is proposing a $6 trillion tax cut and he hasn't said how he'll pay for it. but he still i thought did very well on most counts tonight. barack obama surprised me. i wouldn't call him he was passive tonight. he seemed to pull back a little bit on dodd-frank and preexisting con
. you said you would cut the deficit in half. we still have trillion dollar deficit. less cbs as we will have a trillion dollar deficit in the next four years. >> president obama interrupted again -- think romney might win a and oscar but it was untethered from the truth. the president echoed the complaint. >> i met this very spirited fellow the claim to be a romney. how but it could not have been a robbery. because the real mitt romney has been a are a country for the last year promising 5 trillion dollars in tax cuts that favors the wealthy. the fellow is state last night said he didn't know anything about that. >> leaving denver, met romney can look pleased with himself. one day does not affect the way most people intend to vote, but it means the next string of opinion polls are important. if it narrows, it suggest romney is back in the gate. but if they do not, even after a victory, then he really is in the hole. >> how important was the first debate? i spoke to apolitical blotter and polling number cruncher and the author of a new book, "the signal and the noise, like some any
's debating skills. new jersey governor chris christie on cbs's face the nation yesterday. >> i've seen mitt romney do this before. he's going to come in wednesday night and lay out his vision for america. he's going to contrast what his view is and what the president's record is. and the president's view for the future. this whole race is going to be turned upsidedown come thursday morning. >> woodruff: like wise president obama's senior advisor david pluf offerd this assessment on nbc's meet the press. >> challengers tend to benefit from debates. we've expected all along that governor romney will have a good night. he's prepared more than any candidate in history. he's showing himself to be a very, very good debater through the years. we understand that this is an important moment. >> woodruff: and more important moments are to come. the second presidential debate will be a town hall format at hofstra in hempstead, new york, on october 16. that's to be followed by a foreign policy debate at lynn university in boca raton, florida, on october 22. the vice president shall debate will be held
on the doubleheader and our own jim lehrer will appear in a segment with cbs's bob schieffer on the program "sunday morning" this weekend to talk about the history of presidential debates. >> suarez: and to the last installment this week in our series of reports about america's dropout problem. tonight, we take a second look at a story about life outside the classroom. we head back to st. petersburg, florida, where one boy's enthusiasm for journalism has helped shine a light on problems, while brightening his future at the same time. it's part of our "american graduate" project. this is how 14-year-old de'qonton davis starts every school day in st. petersburg, florida. he wakes up early and walks his 12-year-old sister terrijana six blocks to the bus stop. to the casual eye, his family's neighborhood seems pleasant and sunny. but on closer look, the scars of poverty and a lingering recession become apparent-- high unemployment, foreclosures, and some of the highest crime rates in the city. last month, de'qonton says he began making it a point to walk with his sister, after a man she didn't know rep
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)